Blog

Case Study 1: Waitohu Stream and Dune Care Group, Kapiti Coast

Posted by on Jun 22, 2017 in Blog

Based on an article by Shane Orchard, University of Canterbury. Background This project began in 1999 as a community response to the level of pollution in the Waitohu Stream. It is led by a volunteer group who devote considerable effort to ensuring that members feel valued and can contribute to the project according to their abilities. The formula has been very successful and has resulted in 15 years of work to restore an area of Kapiti Coast District Council reserve land on the west and south banks of Waitohu Stream close to the beach. The project receives very good support from the...

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Community-led approaches and climate change: Perspectives from coastal restoration projects

Posted by on Jun 13, 2017 in Blog

Council-community partnership projects have proven a successful formula for restoring coastal margins. Photo: Shane Orchard Based on an article by Shane Orchard, University of Canterbury. The design of shoreline protection initiatives is a cornerstone topic in the discourse on coastal climate change. Projects to restore degraded coastal margins are an important aspect of this field, and looking ahead, the avoidance of similar degradation issues is an important topic for planning. In recent years, there has been considerable progress achieved in many parts of New Zealand in relation to...

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How will sea level rise impact your neighborhood in the future?

Posted by on Sep 30, 2015 in Blog

As the impacts of sea level rise become more visible in the future, citizens will be faced with decisions on how they live their lives – where they live and work and how they travel and play. These decisions can be informed by information that is already in the public domain, which can assist you in assessing the impacts of sea level rise on your neighborhood. The Auckland Council GIS Viewer contains Coastal Inundation map layers that show the potential impacts of sea level rise. These map layers are based on a NIWA coastal inundation study that shows sea level rise scenarios in the...

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MORE SUBTLE THAN A CYCLONE

Posted by on May 27, 2015 in Blog

Rising sea levels are also more subtle by far than a cyclone. NIWA and Auckland Council coastal scientists want us to get our heads around what sea levels may be like, not next year, but throughout our lifetimes and beyond. These scientists have also highlighted how a storm surge event coinciding with a king tide (and in the future higher sea levels) would dramatically increase the impact on our coastline. What would the impact of Cyclone Pam have been if it had arrived on our coast four days later during the king tide on the 22nd March, where sea levels were around 60cm higher than average?...

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MORE SUBTLE THAN A TSUNAMI

Posted by on Apr 7, 2015 in Blog

The passage of a single year is but the merest blink of an eyelid when talking of king tides as the harbinger of potentially destructive rising sea levels. But 2014 nevertheless proved a massive year for the King Tides Auckland Initiative (King Tides AKL), which began ringing the bell on how sea level changes could impact coastal home owners, businesses, and environmental hot spots and their wildlife. With support and backing from groups like Auckland Council’s Auckland Civil Defence & Emergency Management and Coastal Services Management team, KingtidesAKL has enthused thousands of...

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King Tides Countdown 13 August 2014

Posted by on Aug 26, 2014 in Blog

On Wednesday August 13th 2014, the King Tides Countdown was held at the Beca Auckland Office Auditorium in Auckland City.   Members of the King Tides AKL team broadcasted live stream and real-time photo images of King Tide hotspots from Auckland’s CBD during the count down to the King Tide at 9:31pm. As the countdown approached, we heard from experts from NIWA and Civil Defence, to get some context of the king tide that was witnessed.   Dr Scott Stephens, Coastal Scientist, NIWA “The anatomy of a coastal storm-tide” Coastal flooding and erosion can wreak havoc when high-tides,...

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