Photography: Giving a face to climate change

Posted by on Mar 3, 2014 in Blog

“Having calved from Jakobshavn Glacier, icebergs float out into Disko Bay and ultimately to the Atlantic Ocean.” Photo: James Balog

“Having calved from Jakobshavn Glacier, icebergs float out into Disko Bay and ultimately to the Atlantic Ocean.” Photo: James Balog

Photography is a powerful way to put a face to climate change and help us see, rather than imagine through facts and figures, the changes taking place in our environment.

One of the pioneers of raising climate change awareness through imagery is scientist and photographer James Balog, who has been documenting the changing glaciers in the Northern Hemisphere for nearly a decade as part of the Extreme Ice Survey – which he founded in 2007.

James and his team risked life and limb in some of the most inhospitable places on Earth to set up 28 cameras at 13 glaciers in Greenland, Iceland, Alaska, the Rocky Mountains U.S. and the Nepalese Himalaya. The cameras take a snapshot every half hour during daylight, resulting in approximately 8,000 frames per year, which are then turned into incredible time-lapse videos that show how climate change is dramatically transforming these enormous bodies of ice.

Melting glaciers contribute to sea level rise and as James Balog so eloquently puts it “Ice is the canary in the global coal mine.”

You can check out some of these incredible (and scary) time-lapse videos and photos here

Much in the same way that documenting the change in glaciers is a powerful visual narrative for climate change, photographing King Tides also speaks volumes (excuse the pun) about how climate change is affecting our planet.

Help us create a visual record that shows the changes in our coastlines and raises awareness of sea level rise. Your photos will help us to see how our coastal areas may be transformed by climate change – helping us to prepare for the future.